Wind and Solar vs Natural Gas

By David Melton | Uncategorized

Jan 06

One thing is clear, Wind and Solar Energy are here to stay.  But, what about Natural Gas?  One main and large issue with Wind and Solar Energy is the lack of ability to store any of the energy they create, unlike natural gas reserves (underground storage facilities and LNG).

A common thread with both industries is that they require well trained Landmen, especially in negotiating and understanding associated leases along with acquiring Right-of-Ways and Easements.  

A big source of conflict between the use of natural gas and wind/solar energy is the use of natural gas to generate large amounts of electricity instead of coal.  According to a recent report of the U.S. Energy Information Administration, 36% of natural consumption was used in large electric generating plants, 33% for industrial use, 16% for residential use, 11% for commercial use and 3% for transportation. 

Like with wind and solar, natural gas is an inexpensive and abundant energy source.  But wind and solar energy is subject to blackouts due to no consistent wind source and solar due to no consistent source of sunlight (24/7/365). 

While the oil and gas industry should strive to work in harmony with the idea of less omissions, the fact remain, to change out the entire country’s infrastructure to electricity from wind and solar will be a monumental task, costs astronomical amounts of money, will put a millions of people out of work, not to mention cause the mass replacement of natural gas systems in homes and in appliances.  The author’s opinion would be to funnel some of this new transformation cost to further fund research how to dramatically reduce the omissions from natural gas, rather than try to change the entire country’s infrastructure over a few years.

The idea of alternative fuels for cars, including biofuels and electricity is also a massive undertaking when you consider completely changing the game for all industries from overland trucking, sea and air travel, military, to such things as nationwide mail trucks, etc.  While this idea makes good politics, the practical aspect is a dream in our lifetime. 

However, since that push to start is already here, the alternative energy sector will be needing well trained and diversified personnel to assist with the legal and land aspect of it.  For years, the Petroleum Landman has played a crucial role in oil and gas development.  This push for alternative energy will be creating the need for well-trained Landmen in the Alternative Energy sector. 

If you are wanting to become a Landman working in the wind/solar energy sector or if you are already one who needs to make a change, now is the time to get on this band wagon, before competition makes it harder to enter into the sector.

Respectfully,

David Melton
Founder/Institute of Energy Management, LLC.

About the Author

David Melton Founder, ​ ​Course Author, and Instructor. ​Mr. Melton, professional landman for over 40 years, has acquired vast experience in acquisitions and divestitures as well as executive management skills (VP of Land) for a small E&P company and as a GM of COO for two large land brokerage firms with multiple offices in Oklahoma, Texas, Montana, Colorado, Ohio, West Virginia and Pennsylvania. In addition, Mr. Melton has over 35 years of experience in oil and gas exploration and production including operations, land management and administration in all phases. David formed the Petroleum Landman School in 2005 and has had students from 34 states and two foreign countries. Mr. Melton is a recognized public speaker, course writer and presenter for the AAPL and a published author for the AAPL, IRWA and Oilprice.com. Mr. Melton is the founder of the Professional Landman Schools, parent company of the Institute of Energy Management and the Institute of Energy Development.

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